Department of Integrated Science and Technology

Diploma Policy of Department of Integrated Science and Technology

The goal of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology is to turn out practical-thinking, creative engineers capable of a scientific approach. To this end, the Department awards the Associate Degree to students who have earned the required number of credits in line with general education as well as basic specialized education requirements in the four fields of specialization noted below, and who have acquired the following skills.

  • Based on the knowledge acquired, graduates are able to collaborate with others to solve specific problems (resourcefulness).
  • Students have acquired basic knowledge of mathematics, physics, and chemistry?subjects that form the basis of science and engineering (basic knowledge).
  • Students have acquired both basic and specialized knowledge in their area (specialization).
  • Working with engineers in other areas of specialization, our students are able to devise new plans blending their own area of specialization with those of others (ability to integrate).
  • Students gain an international perspective, where they can do their part for the global society, and are capable of understanding the various issues facing society as well as other cultures (international perspective).
  • Students are able to take an active stance on solving issues pertaining to increasingly complicated, diversifying science and technology fields, and offer specific means of resolving these issues (initiative).
  • Students are capable of organizing and presenting the issues and research content, as well as discussing and sharing it with others (self-expression).

Curriculum Policy of Department of Integrated Science and Technology

In order to achieve our curriculum goals of turning out practical, creative engineers equipped with scientific knowledge and thinking abilities, the Department of Integrated Science and Technology offers a systematic curriculum comprised of general education classes, foundational specialized classes (general foundational classes for all areas of specialization, and compulsory classes), elective program class, and integrative studies classes.

Classes designed to turn out well-rounded individuals and achieve Goal 1: Resourcefulness

All general education classes fall into this category, and all students take them.

Classes designed to impart students with knowledge of basic sciences, Goal 2 (Basic Knowledge)

All basic education classes in all specializations in the category of foundational specialization classes fall into this category, and all students take them.

Classes designed to impart students with a foundation of greater specialized knowledge, Goal 3: Specialization

Amongst basic specialization classes, compulsory classes in each of the areas of specialization fall into this category. Students takes these classes in accordance with their specialization. Additionally, in order to continue to develop the foundations of specialized knowledge, each area of specialization offers two highly specialized programs. Students choose their subject.

Classes designed to give students an interdisciplinary approach, Goal 4: Ability to Integrate

All integrated education classes fall into this category. The goal for these classes is for students to learn about other fields of specialization. All students take them.

Classes designed to give students a global perspective and a sense of responsibility to do their part for the global society, Goal 5: International perspective

Amongst our elective programs, the advancement programs (International Communication Program, Regional Innovation Program, Medical Care and Social Welfare Program) all fall into this category. All students must take three of these classes.

Classes designed to train students to identify and solve issues, Goal 6: Initiative, and Training students in communication and presentation skills, and Goal 7) self-expression

Amongst our integrated education classes, Interdisciplinary Seminars I and II, as well as the graduation research projects, which are part of our basic specialization classes, fall into this category. All students take them.

In addition to being noted in the curriculum class chart for each of the fields of specialization, students are also informed of class content and methodology, class plans,and goals and performance evaluation methodology by way of syllabi posted on the Web. In order to earn credits, students must meet the performance methodology requirements noted on the syllabus take the class, and pass with at least 60%. Lectures, laboratory classes, workshops, Interdisciplinary Studies I and II, and the graduate research project, are evaluated as follows.
Lecture classes are evaluated by tests, problem sets, reports, etc.
Laboratory classes and workshops are evaluated based on approach, written reports, etc.
Interdisciplinary Studies I and II and graduation research projects are evaluated based on project status, reports, presentations, etc.

Department of Integrated Science and Technology

Diploma Policy of Advanced Science Program

Under the diploma policy of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology, students pursue the common and specialized education of the Advanced Science Program, thereby acquiring the foundational and specialized abilities listed below, and upon completion of the units required receive the degree of Associate Bachelor.

  • Based on the knowledge acquired, students are able to collaborate with others to solve specific problems pertaining to advanced sciences (resourcefulness).
  • Students have acquired the basic knowledge of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology?subjects that form the basis of science and engineering (basic knowledge).
  • Students have acquired both basic and specialized knowledge in the advanced sciences, and are capable of applying this knowledge to the fields of mathematics, physics, or to the natural sciences (specialization).
  • Working with engineers and researchers in other areas of specialization, our students are able to devise new plans blending their own area of specialization in the advanced sciences with those of individuals from other science and technology fields (ability to integrate).
  • Students gain an international perspective, where they can do their part for the global society, and are capable of understanding the various issues facing society as well as other cultures (international perspective).
  • Students are able to take an active stance on solving issues pertaining to increasingly complicated, diversifying science and technology fields, and offer specific means of resolving these issues (initiative).
  • Students are capable of organizing and presenting the issues and their research, as well as discussing and sharing this information with others (self-expression).

About the Curriculum of Department of Advanced Science Program

Advanced Science students study science not only for clarifying natural phenomena but also to use for our lives and industries. For example, electronic devices produced by electronic engineering based on quantum mechanics, and materials and products that support the clothing, food and housing industries developed through chemistry. Then there is the spectacular application of biotechnology to regenerative medicine. Still more, the structure and composition of the universe has been studied by astrophysics, astronomy, etc., while the scientific technique expressed by mathematics and natural sciences have been mutually influencing each other.

Thus the Advanced Science Program aims to train engineers/researchers rich in achievements in physical sciences and technical skill. To that end, we set up the slogan "Science education with a broad range from life to space", which indicates a curriculum that uses mathematics, physical science, chemistry, life science, etc. to teach integrated and multi-disciplinary science and fundamental engineering. In the lower grades, students acquire fundamental knowledge of science by studying mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, and computer use. Additionally, Project-based Learning (PBL) courses are implemented to stimulate students’ motivation for natural sciences. In the upper grades, students choose between the Mathematics and Physical Science Program that specializes in mathematics and physics, or the Life Science Program that specializes in chemistry and biology. In the Life Science Program, subjects in the field of biology are also offered considering that they will be easier to learn. Whichever one is selected, students will deepen their expertise in their specialty area.

Mechanical System Program

Diploma Policy of Mechanical Systems Program

Under the diploma policy of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology, students pursue the common and specialized education of the Mechanical Systems Program, thereby acquiring the foundational and specialized abilities listed below, and upon completion of the units required receive the degree of Associate Bachelor.

  • Based on the knowledge acquired, students are able to collaborate with other engineers to solve problems pertaining to mechanical systems (resourcefulness).
  • Students have acquired the basic knowledge of mathematics, physics, and chemistry?subjects that form the basis of engineering (basic knowledge).
  • Students have acquired both basic and specialized knowledge in mechanical engineering, and are capable of applying this knowledge to machine design or robotics (specialization).
  • Working with engineers in other areas of specialization, our students are able to devise new plans to solve issues by blending their own area of specialization, in mechanical systems, with those of individuals from other technology fields (ability to integrate).
  • Students gain an international perspective, where they can do their part for the global society, and are capable of understanding the various issues facing society as well as other cultures (international perspective).
  • Students are able to take an active stance on solving issues pertaining to increasingly complicated, diversifying science and technology fields, and offer specific means of resolving these issues (initiative).
  • Students are capable of organizing and presenting the issues and their research, as well as discussing and sharing this information with others (self-expression).

About the Curriculum of Mechanical Systems Program

Mechanical engineering is the core technology that supports industry and has created various mechanical systems to realize a rich society, in cooperation with the electric and information fields. On the other hand, as a result of neglected harmony with nature, problems such as global warming and air pollution have arisen as a result of development. Thus we must realize a prosperous and sustainable society under the various restrictions facing us now, such as the energy problem, the declining birthrate and the aging population. For that reason, comprehensive development through further deepening and integration with other fields is indispensable for mechanical engineering, and it is necessary for engineers to have a broad perspective to see the whole system.

In the Mechanical Systems Program, we set up a curriculum that enables students to deeply learn about problems and solutions by fusing the essence of mechanical systems with other technical fields, aiming at "training the mechanical systems engineers responsible for the next generation industrial society". Students therefore study mechanical engineering and the science that supports it through multidisciplinary methods. Based on the knowledge of basic science from the lower grades, students acquire knowledge of mechanical design and materials science, as well as basic mechanical subjects. In the upper grades, students acquire knowledge of mechanics, measurement, and control systems from the point of view of dynamics theory, and then choose between the Mechanical Design program focusing on manufacturing processes, or the Robotics program focusing on a wide knowledge of control and information fields and mechatronics. Whichever one is selected, students will deepen their expertise in their specialty area.

Electric and Electronic System Program

Diploma Policy of Electrical and Electronic Systems Program

Under the diploma policy of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology, students pursue the common and specialized education of the Electrical and Electronic Systems Program, thereby acquiring the foundational and specialized abilities listed below, and upon completion of the units required receive the degree of Associate Bachelor.

  • Based on the knowledge acquired, students are able to collaborate with other engineers to solve specific problems pertaining to electrical and electronics engineering systems (resourcefulness).
  • Students have acquired the basic knowledge of mathematics, physics, and chemistry--subjects that form the basis of engineering (basic knowledge).
  • Students have acquired both basic and specialized knowledge of electrical/electronic engineering, and are capable of applying this knowledge to the electronics or environmental energy fields (specialization).
  • Working with engineers in other aeras of specialization, our students are able to devise new plans blending their own area of specialization, in electrical and electronic systems, with those of others in other technical fields (ability to integrate).
  • Students gain an international perspective, where they can do their part for the global society, and are capable of understanding the various issues facing society as well as other cultures (international perspective).
  • Students are able to take an active stance on solving issues pertaining to increasingly complicated, diversifying science and technology fields, and offer specific means of resolving these issues (initiative).
  • Students are capable of organizing and presenting the issues and their research, as well as discussing and sharing this information with others (self-expression).

About the Curriculum of Electrical and Electronic Systems Program

The energy sources (power source, heat source, etc.) used by human beings have long been derived from natural phenomenon (fire, wind, flow of water). Steam engines were put to practical use in the 18th century, and then developed into internal combustion engines. Along with that, energy has also changed from solid fuel (such as coal) to liquid fuel (such as petroleum). When electricity was understood and a stable supply became available, use of electricity gradually became an important source of power (electric motors, etc.). Now, with electronics based on quantum mechanics and the remarkable development of electronics technology such as semiconductors, electricity has become indispensable for telecommunications and systems control.

In the Electrical and Electronic Systems Program, we have set up a curriculum that enables students to learn and solve problems by fusing the essence of the electric and electronic systems field with other technical fields, aiming at "training engineers who are responsible for the environmental energy and electronics society". Students therefore study electrical and electronic engineering and the science that supports it through multi-disciplinary methods. Based on the knowledge of basic science learned in the lower grades, students acquire knowledge of electric circuits, digital engineering, electromagnetics, etc. In the upper grades students acquire knowledge of power generation engineering, electronic circuits, etc., and choose between the Environmental Energy Program, which aims at creating environmentally friendly energy, or the Electronics Program, which aims at creating electronics for an advanced and convenient society. Whichever one is selected, students will deepen their expertise in their specialty area.

Communication and Information System Program

Diploma Policy of Communication and Information Systems Program

Under the diploma policy of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology, students pursue the common and specialized education of the Communication and Information Systems Program, thereby acquiring the foundational and specialized abilities listed below, and upon completion of the units required receive the degree of Associate Bachelor.

  • Based on the knowledge acquired, students are able to collaborate with other engineers to solve specific problems pertaining to information systems (resourcefulness).
  • Students have acquired the basic knowledge of mathematics, physics, and chemistry?subjects that form the basis of science and engineering (basic knowledge).
  • Students have acquired both basic and specialized knowledge of information engineering, and are capable of applying this knowledge to the network or ICT fields (specialization).
  • Working with engineers in other aeras of specialization, our students are able to devise new plans blending their own area of specialization, in information systems, with those of others in other technical fields (ability to integrate).
  • Students gain an international perspective, where they can do their part for the global society, and are capable of understanding the various issues facing society as well as other cultures (international perspective).
  • Students are able to take an active stance on solving issues pertaining to increasingly complicated, diversifying science and technology fields, and offer specific means of resolving these issues (initiative).
  • Students are capable of organizing and presenting the issues and their research, as well as discussing and sharing this information with others (self-expression).

About the Curriculum of Communication and Information Systems Program

Due to changes in the structure of industry and to globalization, modern society cannot function without the help of diverse information systems. In the future, with the spread of IoT (Internet of Things), a society in which everything (such as automobiles and household electric appliances) is networked and centered around the internet and based on the mutual exchange of information, is expected. This rapidly evolving information system supports a rich, safe and secure life, and enables efficient use of resources and energy. For these reasons, reliability, availability, maintainability and operability are important for information systems, and high security performance to prevent attacks and disturbances from inside and outside the organization is necessary.

In the Communication and Information Systems Program, we aim to "train engineers who comprehensively understand information systems, and who can design, build, maintain and operate these systems" by implementing a curriculum that integrates the information systems field with other technical fields so that students become problem solvers with deep technical knowledge. Students therefore study information systems and the science that supports it through multi-disciplinary methods. Based on the basic science learned in the lower grades, students acquire knowledge of programming, basic computer structure, information networks, etc. In the upper grades, students acquire knowledge of fundamental specialized subjects and choose between the Network Program, which focuses on network design, construction, maintenance/operation and telecommunications technology, or the ICT program, which focuses on system design, construction, maintenance and embedded technology that integrates various "things" and "services" by applying information system technology. Whichever one is selected, students will deepen their expertise in their specialty area.